• Agriculture Header

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    Instructor:  Logan Felts

    Organization Involvement:  FFA (Future Farmers of America)


    The agriculture department offers several classes for students in grades 9 through 12 who have an interest in agriculture. Using this interest in agriculture, instructors teach students agricultural concepts, work ethic, leadership, teamwork, and critical thinking skills through hands-on, agricultural-based lessons, and fun FFA activities. The classes offered are Intro Ag. Food & Natural Resources, Animal Science (DC), Adv. Life Science: Animals, Natural Resources (DC), Sustainable Energy Alt., Agribusiness Management (DC), Plant & Soil Science (DC), Horticultural Science (DC), Ag-Power Structure Tech (DC), and Supervised Ag Experience. Students participate in many leadership, community service, and career development activities through the FFA, which is a co-curricular student youth organization.

  • Agriculture Courses

     

    7117 Principles of Agriculture (PRIN AG) DOE# 7117

     

    Principles of Agriculture is a two-semester course that will cover the diversity of the agricultural industry and agribusiness concepts. Students will develop an understanding and the role of agriculture in the United States and globally. Topics covered in the course range from animals, plants, food, natural resources, ag power, structures, and technology, as well as careers.  



    604 Animal Science (ANML SCI) DOE# 5008

     

    Animal Science is a two-semester program that provides students with an overview of the animal agriculture industry. Students participate in a large variety of activities and laboratory work including real and simulated animal science experiences and projects. All areas that the students study may be applied to both large and small animals. Topics to be covered in the course include history and trends in animal agriculture, laws and practices relating to animal agriculture, comparative anatomy and physiology of animals, biosecurity threats and interventions relating to animal and human safety, nutrition, reproduction, careers, leadership, and supervised agricultural experiences relating to animal agriculture.  

     

    • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Agriculture  




    605 Advanced Life Science, Animals (L) (ALS ANIML) DOE# 5070

     

    Advanced Life Science: Animals is a two-semester course that provides students with opportunities to participate in a variety of activities including laboratory work. Students will explore concepts related to history and trends in animal agriculture as related to animal welfare, husbandry, diseases and parasites, laws and practices relating to the handling, housing, environmental impact, global sustainable practices of animal agriculture, genetics, breeding practices, biotechnology uses, and comparative knowledge of anatomy and physiology of animals used in animal agriculture.  

     

    • Required Prerequisites: Principles of Agriculture  
    • Fulfills a science requirement for all diplomas.  
    • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

     

    606 Natural Resources (NAT RSS) DOE# 5180 

     

    Natural Resources is a two-semester course that provides students with a background in environmental science and conservation. Course work includes hands-on learning activities that encourage students to investigate areas of environmental concern. Students are introduced to the following areas of natural resources: soils, the water cycle, air quality, outdoor recreation, forestry, minerals, interrelationships between humans and natural systems, wetlands, wildlife, safety, careers, leadership, and supervised agricultural experience programs. 



    608 Agribusiness Management (AG BUS MGMT) DOE# 5002

     

    Agribusiness Management provides foundation concepts in agricultural business. It is a two-semester course that introduces students to the principles of business organization and management from a local and global perspective, with the utilization of technology. Concepts covered in the course include accounting and record-keeping, business planning and management, food and fiber, forms of business, finance, management, sales and marketing, careers, and leadership development. Students will demonstrate principles and techniques for planning, development, application, and management of agribusiness systems through supervised agriculture experience (work-based learning) programs.

     

    • Qualifies as a quantitative reasoning course

     

    612 Horticultural Science (HORT SCI) DOE# 5132

     

    Horticulture Science is a two-semester course that provides students with a background in the field of horticulture. Coursework includes hands-on activities that encourage students to investigate areas of horticulture as it relates to the biology and technology involved in the production, processing, and marketing of horticultural plants and products. Students are introduced to the following areas of horticulture science: reproduction and propagation of plants, plant growth, growth-media, management practices for field and greenhouse production, marketing concepts, production of plants of local interest, greenhouse management, floral design, and pest management. Students participate in a variety of activities including extensive laboratory work usually in a school greenhouse. 

     

    • Fulfills a Life Science or Physical Science requirement for the General Diploma

     

    607 Sustainable Energy Alternatives (SUS NRG) DOE# 5229 

     

    Sustainable Energy Alternatives broadens a student’s understanding of environmentally friendly energies. In this course, students will use a combination of classroom, laboratory, and field experiences to analyze, critique, and design alternative energy systems. Class content and activities center on renewability and sustainability for our planet. Topics covered in this course include the following types of alternative energies: solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and emerging technologies. Leadership development, supervised agricultural experience, and career exploration opportunities are included in the study of this field. Sustainable energy is also included. 

     

    6582 AGRICULTURE POWER, STRUCTURE AND TECHNOLOGY (AG POW) DOE# 5008

     

    Agriculture Power, Structure and Technology is a lab-intensive course in which students develop an understanding of basic principles of selection, operation, maintenance and management of agricultural equipment in concert while incorporating technology. Topics covered include: safety, electricity, plumbing, concrete, carpentry, metal technology, engines, emerging technologies, leadership development, supervised agricultural experience and career opportunities in the area of agriculture power, structure and technology.  

     

    ANIMAL SCIENCE – 5008 (ALS ANIML)

     

    Animal Science is a two-semester program that provides students with an overview of the animal agriculture industry. Students participate in a large variety of activities and laboratory work including real and simulated animal science experiences and projects. All areas that the students study may be applied to both large and small animals. Topics to be covered in the course include: history and trends in animal agriculture, laws and practices relating to animal agriculture, comparative anatomy and physiology of animals, biosecurity threats and interventions relating to animal and human safety, nutrition, reproduction, careers, leadership, and supervised agricultural experiences relating to animal agriculture.

     

    • Fulfills a Life Science or Physical Science requirement for the General Diploma

     

    615 VETERINARY CAREERS I (VET CRS I) DOE# 5211

     

    Veterinary Careers I is a lab-intensive course that introduces students to animal care and veterinary medicine. Through classroom and field experiences, students will attain the necessary skills to demonstrate standard protocols that are used in veterinary careers. This course also provides students with the knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed to make the transition from high school, to post-secondary opportunities, and to work in a variety of health science careers. Students are encouraged to focus on self-analysis to aid in their career selection. Job seeking and job maintenance skills, personal management skills, and completion of the application process for admission into a post-secondary program are also areas of focus. Participation in HOSA or FFA encourages development of leadership, communication, and career-related skills, and opportunities for community service.